RESEARCHING THE REAL WORLD



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Orientation Observation In-depth interviews Document analysis and semiology Conversation and discourse analysis Secondary Data Surveys Experiments Ethics Research outcomes
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© Lee Harvey 2012–2017

Page updated 29 May, 2017

Citation reference: Harvey, L., 2012–2017, Researching the Real World, available at qualityresearchinternational.com/methodology
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A Guide to Methodology

CASE STUDY Changing perceptions

They looked painfully young to me. I considered their concerns childish and unformed. I could not imagine becoming interested in their daily affairs—in classes, study, dating, and bull sessions. I had memories of my own college days in which I appeared as a child: overemotional, limited in understanding, with an incomprehensible taste for milk shakes and convertibles.

Remembering my attitude as I began to sort out the comments in my field notes I expected to find evidence of this unfavorable adult bias toward adolescents. But on the third day in the field I am already taking the students' side and taking the statements they make seriously.

Adapted from Geer (1964).

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Return to Reflexivity (Section 1.11)

Return to Observation as a basis for identifying subjects' meanings (Section 3.3.2.3)