RESEARCHING THE REAL WORLD



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Basics

Orientation Observation In-depth interviews Document analysis and semiology Conversation and discourse analysis Secondary Data Surveys Experiments Ethics Research outcomes
Conclusion

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Activities

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© Lee Harvey 2012–2017

Page updated 29 May, 2017

Citation reference: Harvey, L., 2012–2017, Researching the Real World, available at qualityresearchinternational.com/methodology
All rights belong to author.


 

A Guide to Methodology

3. Observation

3.1 Introduction
3.2 Aspects
3.3 Methodological approaches
3.4 Access

3.4.1 Introduction
3.4.2 Negotiating with gatekeepers
3.4.3 Insider status
3.4.4 Continuing negotiation of access
3.4.5 The interrelationship of access negotiation and data collection

3.5 Recording data
3.6 Analysing observational or ethnographic data
3.7 Summary

3.4 Access

3.4.5 The interrelationship of access negotiation and data collection
Negotiating access and data collection are not distinct aspects of the research process, they overlap, and the process of negotiating access can provide valuable information about the nature of the social setting being observed.

For example, the openness with which a person may describe criminal activities shows the matter-of-fact way that the deviant 'career' is seen.

Howard Newby (1977), in his study of farm workers, noted that having to go through the farmer in order to contact the workers was in itself important evidence that clearly indicated how significant the employer was in the lives of the farm workers.

Access to a research setting and subsequent withdrawal from it raise ethical questions, which are examined in Section 10

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Next 3.5 Recording data