RESEARCHING THE REAL WORLD



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Orientation Observation In-depth interviews Document analysis and semiology Conversation and discourse analysis Secondary Data Surveys Experiments Ethics Research outcomes
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© Lee Harvey 2012–2019

Page updated 25 January, 2019

Citation reference: Harvey, L., 2012–2019, Researching the Real World, available at qualityresearchinternational.com/methodology
All rights belong to author.


 

A Guide to Methodology

4. In-depth interviews

4.1 Introduction to in-depth interviewing
4.2 Types of in-depth interview
4.3 Methodological approaches to in-depth interviews

4.3.1 Positivist approaches to in-depth interviews
4.3.2 Phenomenological approaches to in-depth interview

4.3.2.1 Identifying subjects' meanings or perceptions
4.3.2.1.1 Phenomenography
4.3.2.2 In-depth interviews as a basis for empathetic interpretation
4.3.2.3 Deconstructing everyday life/rules of behaviour
4.3.2.4 Life history interviewing as a means to establish how people come to develop specific ideas and consequent actions
4.3.2.4.1 Autobiography
4.3.2.4.2 Oral history

4.3.3 Critical approaches to in-depth interview

4.4 Doing in-depth interviews
4.5 Analysing in-depth interview data
4.6 Summary and conclusion

4.3 Phenomenological approaches to in-depth interviews
Phenomenologists tend to make extensive use of in-depth interviews as a means of gathering detailed information on people's lives, perceptions and interpretations of the world.

Phenomenological approaches use in-depth interviews:

1. to identify subjects' meanings, perceptions or behaviour;

2. as a basis for empathetic interpretation;

3. as a means of deconstructing everyday life;

4. as a means to establish how people come to develop specific ideas and consequent actions.

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