RESEARCHING THE REAL WORLD



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Orientation Observation In-depth interviews Document analysis and semiology Conversation and discourse analysis Secondary Data Surveys Experiments Ethics Research outcomes
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© Lee Harvey 2012–2019

Page updated 25 January, 2019

Citation reference: Harvey, L., 2012–2019, Researching the Real World, available at qualityresearchinternational.com/methodology
All rights belong to author.


 

A Guide to Methodology

4. In-depth interviews

4.1 Introduction to in-depth interviewing
4.2 Types of in-depth interview
4.3 Methodological approaches to in-depth interviews
4.1 Introduction to in-depth interviewing
4.2 Types of in-depth interview
4.3 Methodological approaches to in-depth interviews
4.4 Doing in-depth interviews

4.4.1 Constructing an interview guide
4.4.2 Setting up the interviews
4.4.3 Interviewing

4.4.3.1 Rapport

4.4.3.1.1 Exploitation
4.4.3.1.2 The male paradigm
4.4.3.1.3 Dialogic interviewing
4.4.3.1.4 Limits of shared experience
4.4.3.1.5 Power relations
4.4.3.1.6 Empowering
4.4.3.1.7 Objectivication of subject cannot be avoided

4.4.3.2 Probing
4.4.3.3 Foreign language complications
4.4.3.4 Remote interviewing
4.4.3.4.1 Telephone interviewing
4.4.3.4.2 Asynchronous interviews
4.4.3.5 Follow-up interviews
4.4.3.6 Focus groups

4.4.4 Recording interview data

4.5 Analysing in-depth interview data
4.6 Summary and conclusion

4.4 Doing in-depth interviews

4.4.3.1.7 Objectivication of subject cannot be avoided
There is an argument, that whatever the intention of the dialogic interview process, it is impossible in practice to avoid any objectification of research participants, certainly at the stage of research analysis. Indeed by attempting to make women dialogic partners, Maureen Cain (1986) suggests that it maybe that all one is doing is encouraging women respondents to collude in making themselves an object of study.

The objectivication of the subject is not a problem just of dialogic interviewing but of all forms of interviewing (Ramazanoglu, 1989). Rather more controversially, Cain (1986), Carol Smart (1984) and Sandra Harding (1987) have suggested that the feminist approach to dialogic interviewing might be appropriate when studying relatively powerless subjects but it might not be appropriate, indeed may be counter productive, to the development of feminist theory of the powerful.

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