RESEARCHING THE REAL WORLD



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Orientation Observation In-depth interviews Document analysis and semiology Conversation and discourse analysis Secondary Data Surveys Experiments Ethics Research outcomes
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© Lee Harvey 2012–2019

Page updated 25 January, 2019

Citation reference: Harvey, L., 2012–2019, Researching the Real World, available at qualityresearchinternational.com/methodology
All rights belong to author.


 

A Guide to Methodology

4. In-depth interviews

4.1 Introduction to in-depth interviewing
4.2 Types of in-depth interview
4.3 Methodological approaches to in-depth interviews
4.4 Doing in-depth interviews

4.4.1 Constructing an interview guide
4.4.2 Setting up the interviews
4.4.3 Interviewing

4.4.3.1 Rapport
4.4.3.2 Probing
4.4.3.3 Foreign language complications
4.4.3.4 Remote interviewing

4.4.3.4.1 Telephone interviewing
4.4.3.4.2 Asynchronous interviews

4.4.3.5 Follow-up interviews
4.4.3.6 Focus groups

4.4.4 Recording interview data

4.5 Analysing in-depth interview data
4.6 Summary and conclusion

4.4 Doing in-depth interviews

4.4.3.4 Remote interviewing
Remote interviewing is when the researcher and the respondent are spatially separated and using a communication device to undertake the in-depth interview. This can be done synchronously, where each person takes turns in an on-going conversation or asynchronously, where the researcher sends a question or questions and at a different time, the respondent replies.

Telephone interviews are a form of synchronous remote interview and are aural unless there is a visual connection, such as through some camera-linked Internet connections. On-line chat is another form of synchronous remote interview.

Email interviews are the main form of synchronous remote interview. The researcher sends an email with a question or questions and follows up the response. Where this involves follow-ups and several exchanges of emails, this is similar to an in-depth interview. Where just one email is sent with a single email response, the interview begins to resemble an unstructured on-line questionnaire (see Section 8).

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Next 4.4.3.4.1 Telephone interviewing